Seeing Jesus in the Exodus

© William Perry | Dreamstime.com

The Old Testament is to the New Testament as childhood is to adulthood, as shaking the present is to unwrapping it, as training is to the main game.  Exodus is rich with events, people and even objects that point towards Jesus;  from them we can understand more of his identity, his mission, his relationship to us.

So far we’ve met Moses, a man specially chosen and prepared by God to lead his people from cruel oppression under the Egyptian ruler, to obedience to the Creator of the universe.  Moses is a prophet – God speaks directly to him, and through him to God’s people and others.

Moses was both one of God’s people, and one of Egypt’s people – he was therefore able to mediate between them. In these ways, Moses is a picture for us of Jesus, who was chosen and prepared by God to lead all people from the destructiveness of living without God, to the freedom of forgiveness and obedience to him.  Jesus is a prophet, speaking God’s message to those who believe in God, and to those who don’t.  But much more than a prophet, Jesus is both human and God, so he is both the perfect messenger from God to us and the perfect mediator between God and us.

In Exodus we’ve seen the innocent lamb that was slaughtered in place of the firstborn son of each household;  hinting of Jesus, who was innocent of disobeying or disrespecting God, but was executed in place of us, who have done both.  Last week, we heard about the bread from heaven that God supplied to his people when they were starving in the desert – in John 6 Jesus says that he is the bread of heaven that gives life to the world.

Today, in Exodus 17:1-7, God’s people have no water again, but instead of trusting God to provide, they ridiculously accuse Moses of deliberately leading them to the desert so their children and cattle can die there.  God’s answer is to supply a rock;  Moses is to strike it, and from it water will gush to give life to the people.  How does this incident point us to Jesus?

- Katie Peken

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